Bean bags, sleep pods and bicycles are some of the things that come into when mentioning autonomy in the workplace. An utopian ideal that assumes to foster positive employee emotions at the expense of productivity. However, Daniel H. Pink points out in his book Drive, there is substantial evidence for autonomous workplaces that achieve impactful…

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Earlier this week I wrote an article diving into what Daniel H. Pink in his book Drive describes as Motivation 2.0. In a nutshell, Motivation 2.0 is the ‘carrot and stick model’, give someone an incentive and that should make them want to do a task. Problems arise on deeper analysis where certain incentives are…

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  Entitled, spoiled, naive are all words that associated with Millennial behavior. According to Gallup Research, 66% of employees in the workplace are either disengaged or actively disengaged. Many employers have tried to motivate employees including Millennials with the ‘carrot and stick model’. In the New York Times Bestseller, Drive by Daniel H. Pink, describes…

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We have all been there. During a conversation, you finish explaining a particular point and the next person begins talking. However, you know they didn’t absorb a single thing you said. Even though they nodded their head and acted interested, everything else signaled you were communicating with a brick wall. How would have that conversation…

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In the process of reading Extreme Ownership- How U.S. Navy Seal Lead and Win, the authors share their accounts of military experience, lessons learned and its applicability to the workplace. I often find reading books out of traditional corporate books very helpful in understanding the underlying principles of leading and creating great teams. The authors,…

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In the #1 New York Times Bestseller, Extreme Ownership– How U.S. Navy Seals Lead and Win point out a bizarre yet well supported premise- ‘there are no bad teams, only bad leaders’. With this premise, the younger generation that is commonly criticized for being narcissistic and entitled brings up the question- who fault is it…

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During my sophomore year at the University of California Berkeley, I was one of 400 students in the intro to computer science course. By the time I was graduated, that intro class tripled in size. That extreme change is symbolic of today’s software engineer economic demand. Consequently people all around the world are deciding to…

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The other day, I wrote a post Should Employees Have Transparent Salaries which dove into a few startups including my own, regarding our experiences with these transparent salaries. Warning, spoiler alert! The article reached a consensus that having transparent salaries was not a good idea when considering the pros and cons of doing so. However,…

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  In 2011, a tech startup called SumAll decided to try something new. Instead letting everyone negotiating their salaries and hiding who gets paid what, the startup decided to pull the curtain back- letting everyone know each other’s salary. Within their database, there was a table that had everyone’s name and their corresponding salary. Anyone had…

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Well, the evidence seems pretty clear, behavior scientists state that if you give consistent feedback, set ambitious goals, and provide proper incentives, Millennials and nearly everyone performs better.   However, according to a recent review done by UC Berkeley Haas assistant professor Juliana Schroeder and Ayelet Fishbach of Chicago School of Business, by comparing 150…

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